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Full Scholarships Available for Youth Workshop on August 9-10

2016 June 2
by Karen Purcell
youth_010

We are offering full scholarships for youth and chaperones living in low-income communities in the United States and Puerto Rico.

Thanks to Thomas Cade Funds we will provide full scholarships for urban youth to attend a two-day Birds, Careers, and Conservation Workshop at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology August 9-10. Scholarships will cover travel, accommodations, meals, and cost of the workshop. We are looking for outstanding teens, 12-19 years old, who are interested in learning more about careers in science and conservation and who would like to have an impact in their community. Scholarships will be awarded on the basis of financial need and academic potential.

Please see a description of our April 2016 workshop to better understand the activities offered.

The workshop will focus on careers in the sciences, learning about conservation science, and what youth can do in their neighborhoods to make a difference. In addition, participants will learn about Cornell, learn about cutting-edge conservation science research at the Lab, explore the value of participatory science and critical thinking, and learn about paths to higher education. Staff from seven departments at the Cornell Lab will share their expertise and time.

To NOMINATE one or more youth for the workshop please fill out the application here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/S5D6HN7

Once we receive nominations we will contact you to schedule a phone conversation.

To APPLY for a scholarship (youth) please fill out the application here:   https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/BZWB9B8

Once we receive the application we will contact you to let you know if we’d like to schedule a phone interview.

Please be aware that youth will need to travel to Cornell with an adult chaperone. (Funds for attendance will be provided, if needed.) If you nominate a youth or are a student applicant, you must include the name of the chaperone that will accompany the student(s) to the workshop.

Our application/nomination deadline is June 30.

Questions? Email urbanbirds@cornell.edu or call 607-254-2123.

Workshop for Community Advocates and Grassroots Leaders on October 18-19

2016 June 2
by Karen Purcell
youth_028

We are offering full scholarships for community advocates and grassroots leaders working in low-income communities. 

Thanks to support from Cornell College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Thomas Cade Funds, we will be offering a two-day citizen science/Celebrate Urban Birds workshop here at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

This workshop is for community advocates and grassroots leaders who want to learn about citizen science, engaging communities in conservation through the arts, birdwatching, and greening programs at the Cornell Lab. Leaders must be working in low-income communities and should be interested in leading community programming in citizen science and birds.

Full scholarships cover travel, lodging, meals, and cost of the  workshop. 

Scholarship application in English: APPLY HERE

Postulación en Español: POSTULA AQUÍ

Applications must be received by August 15. 

Questions? Email urbanbirds@cornell.edu

Texas Parks and Wildlife goes birding with local schools!

2016 February 29
by Laura Pineda-Bermudez
Courtesy of Adrianna Weickhardt

Courtesy of Adrianna Weickhardt

Courtesy of Adrianna Weickhardt

Courtesy of Adrianna Weickhardt

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department put on a wonderful program that reached out to two schools in the El Paso area. A total of 77 participants from Americas High school and their feeder school, Vista Del Sol were involved in the very first “Celebrate Urban Birds!” event. The students arrived to Franklin Mountains State Park and spent the morning learning how to use the binoculars to identify birds, hiking, identifying bird calls, learning bird anatomy, and discussing the importance of citizen science!

Courtesy of Adrianna Weickhardt

Courtesy of Adrianna Weickhardt

Each high schooler was paired with a younger “buddy” for the day from the elementary school and served as a mentor. The high schoolers guided their buddies through a fun, hands-on activity that allowed the students to get creative back at the high school. They each received a planter to decorate and seeds to plant that would serve as food sources for birds and butterflies. The idea behind the activity was to teach about the importance of creating “green spaces” to provide habitats for birds and other wildlife in urban environments. The busy day ended with data collection as part of a citizen science activity, where students tallied the number of birds observed within a given area during a set time period.

Both the mentors and their buddies went home happy at the end of the day! One of the teachers, Neysa Hardin commented on the success of the event:

Courtesy of Adrianna Weickhardt

Courtesy of Adrianna Weickhardt

“Thank you to Cesar, Adrianna, and John at Franklin Mountains State Park. The students had an incredible day! My high school students said that this was one of their best experiences ever. Not only did they learn about our local urban birds, but they also enjoyed being mentors for the day! The elementary students told their librarian that they can’t wait to visit the park again with their high school buddies. We look forward to partnering up again! Thank you a million times for this unique experience.”

Courtesy of Adrianna Weickhardt

Courtesy of Adrianna Weickhardt

This tremendous event has had a great impact on both the participants and the surrounding community. Through this event, the students have been able to gain awareness and appreciation for birds and nature in their very own backyard. The high school students stepped up to their roles as mentors and really made an effort to be engaged and supportive throughout the activities. The relationships strengthened between the schools and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department have also been incredible! By holding activities in both the high school and state park, a bridge between the “wild” and the “urban” was formed, making connections between both habitats.

A huge thank you to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department for putting on a magnificent event!!